In Memory Of Karen Nicole Smith, 1972 - 2016

Curry Stew (ed) Goat.


Here’s another Caribbean Classic! Curry Stew Goat.. seasoned with an exciting curry-based marinade, then brown-stewed as it’s typically done on the islands. It’s then cooked slowly to develop rich flavors and fall-off-the-bone tenderness. #Goatober

You’ll Need…

4-5 lbs goat (bone in)
1 1/2 tablespoon Caribbean Green Seasoning
1 teaspoon salt (adjust)
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 medium onion (sliced)
1 medium tomato (diced)
1 scotch bonnet pepper (sliced)
3-4 cups water
1/2 cup coconut milk powder
5-8 cloves garlic (whole)
1 tablespoon grated ginger
1 1/2 tablespoon golden brown sugar + 2 tablespoon olive oil
1-2 tablespoon parsley (chopped)
2 limes (juice) for washing the goat.

Important! If doing this recipe gluten free, please go through the full list of ingredients to make sure they meet with your specific gluten free dietary needs. Especially the curry powder you use, as some may have flour as a filler and thickener.

  • this recipe will work with lamb and I find that you get better results with using bone-in goat. Do ask your butcher to cut it into small pieces as you will struggle to get through the bones with your everyday chef’s knife of clever.

Trim the excess fat and wash the meat (with lime juice and cool water), drain well, then season with the salt, curry powder, black pepper, Caribbean Green Seasoning, onion, tomato, scotch bonnet pepper (adjust to the heat level you can handle) and grated ginger. Mix well!

Marinate overnight or at least 2 hours in the fridge.

Heat the oil in a deep pot (heavy cast iron works best) on a medium / high flame, then add the sugar. This is the stewing or browning part. The curry element was added when we seasoned and marinated the goat.

This step is crucial as we don’t want to BURN the sugar. The sugar will melt, go frothy, then we need it to go a deep amber color (yes the kitchen will go a bit smoky). At this point (be careful) add the seasoned goat to the pot and stir to coat in the caramelized sugar. Should it go beyond amber (BLACK), STOP. Allow the pot to cool completely, wash, dry and start over. Burnt Sugar will give you a bitter taste.

  • watch the video below to see how I did the step mentioned above.

Turn the heat to medium/low, add the whole cloves of garlic and cover the pot. It will sprout up it’s own natural juices. Let it go for about 10 minutes with lid on.

Place the water in the same bowl you marinated the goat in and swish around to pick up any remaining marinade.

After 10 minutes, remove the lid and crank up the heat to burn off all that natural liquid. In the process we’ll develop a lovely color. It will take 4-6 minutes. The goal is to see the oil we started off with and no liquid at the bottom of the pot. Please stir so we get even browning, as this happens.

When this is achieved, pour in the water (from the bowl we marinated the goat in) and bring to a boil. Add the coconut powder and stir well to incorporate. As it comes to a boil, reduce to a simmer and cook until tender (lid on, but slightly ajar).

Depending on how old/mature the goat was when it was butchered it can take between 2 and 3 hours on that simmer to be tender. In rare cases it can take up to 4 hours.

Taste for salt, adjust the gravy (thickness) to your liking (add more water if you find that the goat is still tough) and top with the parsley. Goat can be fatty and the parsley tends to help cut some of that.. I also like adding some lemon zest at times too, for the same reason.

While I’m a huge fan of curry goat and stewed goat, this combination is by far, my fave! I like mine served with plain hot rice or with Paratha (buss-up-shut) roti.

Drop me your comments below, tag me on Instagram and don’t forget you can now get my cookbook – The Vibrant Caribbean Pot, 100 Traditional And Fusion Recipes @ CaribbeanPot.com/CookBook/

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