In Memory Of Karen Nicole Smith, 1972 - 2016

The Ultimate Stewed Goat.


I only started making Stew(ed) Goat a couple years now. As a son of the Caribbean soil, Curry Goat was always the go-to recipe when it comes to this meat. And even though I take every opportunity I get to cook on the grill outside, I’ve only grilled goat once. SHAME! I shall do more goat on the grill recipes in the coming months. Back to today’s recipe.. seasoned, marinated, then slowly braised in a rich coconut stew gravy until it’s fork tender.

You’ll Need…

4 lbs goat (with bones)
3/4 tablespoon salt
1 onion (diced)
2 heaping tablespoon Caribbean Green Seasoning
4-6 drops Angostura bitters
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
3/4 tablespoon pepper sauce
1 tomato (diced)
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
3 pimento peppers (seasoning peppers)
1 tablespoon tomato ketchup
1 1/2 tablespoon olive oil
1 1/2 tablespoon golden brown sugar
2 1/2 – 3 cups water
2 scallions (chopped)
4-6 cloves garlic (smashed)
1 tablespoon grated ginger
1 1/2 cup coconut milk
5 sprigs thyme
2 tablespoon parsley chopped

  • Get your butcher to cut the goat into 2 inch pieces as the bones can be very tough and will ruin your knives even your heavy duty cleaver. Wash with cool water and the juice of a lime or lemon or about 1/4 cup of plain white vinegar. Rinse and drain.

Place the prepared goat in a large bowl, then add the salt, black pepper ketchup (yes you heard correctly), Worcestershire sauce, pepper-sauce, Caribbean Green Seasoning, Bitters, Onion, Pimento peppers (optional) and tomato. Mix well and allow to marinate for at least a couple hours.

Heat a heavy pot on a high flame, then add the oil followed by the brown sugar. Or (if you’re new to it) please watch the video below. Move around the sugar – it will melt, go frothy and then a deep amber in color (do NOT go past this point or it will taste burnt). Add the seasoned goat to the pot and mix well. Should the sugar go BLACK.. STOP – allow the pan to cool completely and wash. Then start back.

Be careful when adding the seasoned goat to the pot as the hot oil/sugar combo can burn you easily if it splatters. Yes the marinade goes into the pot as well, but save the bowl (don’t wash yet).

It’s important that you give this a good mix, then place the lid on and bring to a boil. Once it comes to a boil, reduce to a simmer. A lot of natural juices will spring-up. Lid on and cook for 10 minutes.

Then it’s time to intensify both the flavor and color, so remove the lid, crank up the heat and burn off all that liquid until you see the oil you started off with.

Add the grated ginger, fresh thyme, scallions and garlic. Then (heat still on high) pour the water into the bowl where you marinated the goat in and swish around. Before you add that water to the pot, go in with the coconut milk, then the water and bring to a boil

Be sure to see my tip on removing some of the fat to make this a bit healthier for you, in the video below.

Bring this to a boil, then reduce to a simmer (LOW heat), lid on (slightly ajar) and cook until the goat is fork tender. Stir every 10-15 minutes.

2 1/2 hours later after we added the water and started the simmering process, the goat should be tender. However if it’s still tough you may have to cook it longer (depends on the age of the goat when it was butchered).

Here’s where we’ll now personalize things to your liking. Check the salt (adjust if necessary) and keep an eye on the consistency of the gravy (remember it will thicken as it cools down). If to your liking, toss in the parsley and shut off the stove.

Yes I’m sure you can cheat and do part of this in a pressure cooker, but I’m not a fan of those devices and much prefer low and slow cooking, like my ancestors. Note that it’s normal if your goat takes much more time to cook. If that is the case, add more water (boiling) to the pot when necessary.

Drop me your comments below, tag me on Instagram and don’t forget you can now get my cookbook – The Vibrant Caribbean Pot, 100 Traditional And Fusion Recipes @ CaribbeanPot.com/CookBook/

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