Categorized |Bits and Bites, Gluten Free, Vegetarian

How To Make Haitian Pikliz (Picklese).

The Caribbean is flooded with pepper sauces and condiments of all kinds as it’s simply part of our culinary culture. The textures, heat level, ingredients, ways of preserving and overall vibrancy of them all are unique to the maker and individual island. In Trinidad and Tobago you’ll find a lot of chutneys and amchars, while in Barbados you’ll hear the locals boast about their peppersauce. As someone who consider myself an aficionado of anything hot and spicy, it must be said that Haitian Pikliz is at the top of my list when it comes to spicy condiments.

The slight crunch of the vegetables, the heat from the thinly sliced scotch bonnet peppers and the flavors the vinegar (takes on) which is use to bring it all together is just outstanding (after marinating for about a week or so).

This recipe is dedicated to the beautiful people of Haiti.

You’ll Need…

2 cups shredded cabbage
1 large carrot
1 cup bell pepper (green, orange, red)
1 onion
2 scallions
6 scotch bonnet peppers
4 cloves garlic
1 teaspoon salt
12-14 peppercorns
2 cups vinegar (see note)
1/2 lime juice

* 4 cloves (traditionally used)

Note: Add enough vinegar to cover the ingredients in the storage container. Allow to marinate for about 5 days before use. I was out of cloves, but it’s a traditional ingredient used in making this lovely pickle, so I would recommend using.

 

This is a very simple recipe to put together as it involves a couple steps and some patience (to marinate). Start off by slicing the cabbage very thinly, same for the all the other ingredients. You may be tempted to use a food processor, but I would suggest you don’t. The food processor may overwork the vegetables and you won’t get that unique size/shape pikliz is supposed to have. Grate the carrot and diced the garlic very fine.

Place all the sliced ingredient sin a large bowl .. large enough so you can easily mix everything easily without spilling all over the place. Also mix in the salt, pepper corns and cloves.

Get a fairly large glass bottle and pack in everything, then all you have to do is top with the vinegar, cover and set aside to marinate. You can certainly begin using right away, but if you give it about five days to marinate and really take on the flavors of everything you’ll be rewarded with the best pikliz you’ve ever had.

Since we used vinegar as the base, it will act as a preservative so you don’t have to worry about it going bad if you don’t store it in the fridge. However, if you do store it in the fridge it can last months. But be aware that some the heat will be lost the longer it stays in the fridge. Now if only I had some Griot to accompany this Pikliz!

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How To Make Haitian Pikliz (Picklese).
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29 Responses to “How To Make Haitian Pikliz (Picklese).”

  1. Ila Woo says:

    We made the pikliz and it was amazing! I made it for my family and 2 co workers. It was so easy to make, and so fresh. I don’t usually eat spicy anything, but I was drawn by the fragrance and after tasting it I was sold. I surely recommend waiting 7-10 days before eating. I tasted at day 3… one word, DELICIOUS!

  2. Janet says:

    Just got back from Haiti! Pikliz was sitting on the counter in the kitchen where I stayed it. It’s just cabbage and carrots with peppers and basic white vinegar over it. Just enough to cover it. The cook, in her broken English, said that you can put in it whatever you want. I have this now sitting on my kitchen counter. My son and I love it!

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. […] what I’m going to do with the plantain. I already have some spicy Haitian pikliz in the refrigerator. They are SO yummy together that my mouth is watering just thinking about it. […]

  2. […] Port-Salut Caves of Haiti Bassin-Bleu Pic La Selle La Visite National Park National Museum of Haiti Pickliz Griot G Adventures Highlights of Haiti Tour Haiti (site not in […]

  3. […] While the two dishes serve similar purpose, kimchi has more of a sour note, which can be attributed to the fermentation process. Pikliz on the other hand is pickled with vinegar and citrus juice which gives it a bright, smack-your-lips, sort of flavor. Personally, I’m more fond of the latter, but this is probably because I grew up eating it (recipe for pikliz). […]

  4. […] as that black rice was, the crème de la crème was the pikliz. This is, in my opinion, the greatest condiment on the planet. Cole slaw’s mature, spicy, […]

  5. […] While the two dishes serve similar purpose, kimchi has more of a sour note, which can be attributed to the fermentation process. Pikliz on the other hand is pickled with vinegar and citrus juice which gives it a bright, smack-your-lips, sort of flavor. Personally, I’m more fond of the latter, but this is probably because I grew up eating it (recipe for pikliz). […]

  6. […] While the two dishes serve similar purpose, both are relishes made from cabbage. Kimchi has more of a sour note, which can be attributed to the fermentation process. Pikliz on the other hand is pickled with vinegar and citrus juice which gives it a bright, smack-your-lips, sort of flavor. Personally, I’m more fond of pikliz, but this is probably because I grew up eating it (recipe for pikliz). […]

  7. […] you can use a traditional recipe like this, but the heat level (4-6 scotch peppers???) scares me… so I have my non-traditional less […]


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