Categorized | Bits and Bites, Vegetarian

How To Make Haitian Pikliz (Picklese).

The Caribbean is flooded with pepper sauces and condiments of all kinds as it’s simply part of our culinary culture. The textures, heat level, ingredients, ways of preserving and overall vibrancy of them all are unique to the maker and individual island. In Trinidad and Tobago you’ll find a lot of chutneys and amchars, while in Barbados you’ll hear the locals boast about their peppersauce. As someone who consider myself an aficionado of anything hot and spicy, it must be said that Haitian Pikliz is at the top of my list when it comes to spicy condiments.

The slight crunch of the vegetables, the heat from the thinly sliced scotch bonnet peppers and the flavors the vinegar (takes on) which is use to bring it all together is just outstanding (after marinating for about a week or so).

This recipe is dedicated to the beautiful people of Haiti.

You’ll Need…

2 cups shredded cabbage
1 large carrot
1 cup bell pepper (green, orange, red)
1 onion
2 scallions
6 scotch bonnet peppers
4 cloves garlic
1 teaspoon salt
12-14 peppercorns
2 cups vinegar (see note)
1/2 lime juice

* 4 cloves (traditionally used)

Note: Add enough vinegar to cover the ingredients in the storage container. Allow to marinate for about 5 days before use. I was out of cloves, but it’s a traditional ingredient used in making this lovely pickle, so I would recommend using.

 

This is a very simple recipe to put together as it involves a couple steps and some patience (to marinate). Start off by slicing the cabbage very thinly, same for the all the other ingredients. You may be tempted to use a food processor, but I would suggest you don’t. The food processor may overwork the vegetables and you won’t get that unique size/shape pikliz is supposed to have. Grate the carrot and diced the garlic very fine.

Place all the sliced ingredient sin a large bowl .. large enough so you can easily mix everything easily without spilling all over the place. Also mix in the salt, pepper corns and cloves.

Get a fairly large glass bottle and pack in everything, then all you have to do is top with the vinegar, cover and set aside to marinate. You can certainly begin using right away, but if you give it about five days to marinate and really take on the flavors of everything you’ll be rewarded with the best pikliz you’ve ever had.

Since we used vinegar as the base, it will act as a preservative so you don’t have to worry about it going bad if you don’t store it in the fridge. However, if you do store it in the fridge it can last months. But be aware that some the heat will be lost the longer it stays in the fridge. Now if only I had some Griot to accompany this Pikliz!

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17 Responses to “How To Make Haitian Pikliz (Picklese).”

  1. Ravi says:

    Thanks for the pikliz recipe! The first time I made it came out good, but the vinegar seemed to overwhelm the smell & taste of everything else. Question: When I slice scotch bonnets to add to recipe, do we include the seeds of the scotch bonnets or not?

  2. kelly83 says:

    CAN I USE APPLE CIDER OR BALSAMIC VINEGAR OR JUST PLAIN VINEGAR

    • maria says:

      I used rice vinegar found on the chinese stores or at Wal-Mart it has a red label and is a little sweet not as sour as regular vinegar

  3. VALERIE says:

    HMMM….I’VE NEVER HEARD OF IT WITH SWEET PEPPERS, GARLIC, & PEPPERCORNS. BUT I WAS SEARCHING AROUND FOR DIFFERENT TWISTS. ON YOUTUBE I FOUND A WOMAN WHO USES SOUR ORANGE INSTEAD OF VINEGAR. I’M NOT FOND OF THE IDEA OF BELL PEPPERS BUT TOMORROW ILL ADD GARLIC TO MY BATCH… AND I DEFINITELY NEED TO RUN OUT FOR SOME MORE BONNET PEPPERS. I RAN OUT AND ITS DEFINITELY NOT HOT ENOUGH. THANKS!!!

  4. Gerardo says:

    I´m Dominican And after the earthquake i was workin in Haiti, and the first time i ate pikliz i felt in love whit it !!!!!

  5. Alicia says:

    I suggest you first boil the pot and the lid, also some recipes call to boil the vinegar. Anyway, lovely recipe! Thanks!!

  6. Great recipe! The first time I had this I was a young boy of seven living in Bizoton, a suburb of Port-au-Prince, living with my parents (Dad worked for Standard Fruit and Steamship Company). It was called Sauce Ti Malice or Sauce Piment (pee-mahn) by our Haitian cook, Alice. I bawled like a baby after the first bite of it – have since grown to love it since then. I like this version of the recipe, the other one, published everywhere, doesn’t include the garlic which is a grave omission IMHO.

  7. Karen says:

    Hi Chris,
    Thanks so much for your blog. I make pikliz, but instead of using the acid, I ferment it. It is great! Fermenting adds probiotics that help the gut. Still wicked hot, but with added health benefits. Similar to Colombian cortido.

  8. BahamaMama says:

    I had pikliz with griot before and I absolutely LOVED it! I can’t wait to try my own pikliz, I’ve been jonesing for some since that last time many years ago. Thanks! :o)

  9. Holly says:

    I love pikliz from my trip to Haiti! Do you think I could preserve this by canning it? If so, how would I keep it crisp?

    If you could email me that would be wonderful!

    Thanks

    Holly

  10. Foodtastic says:

    LOVE pikliz!! Thanks for the recipe!

  11. Karen Chinnon says:

    Thank you for these great recipes! Enjoying making them!

  12. Justine says:

    Looks great and spicy! What do you serve with this?

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. [...] While the two dishes serve similar purpose, kimchi has more of a sour note, which can be attributed to the fermentation process. Pikliz on the other hand is pickled with vinegar and citrus juice which gives it a bright, smack-your-lips, sort of flavor. Personally, I’m more fond of the latter, but this is probably because I grew up eating it (recipe for pikliz). [...]

  2. [...] While the two dishes serve similar purpose, both are relishes made from cabbage. Kimchi has more of a sour note, which can be attributed to the fermentation process. Pikliz on the other hand is pickled with vinegar and citrus juice which gives it a bright, smack-your-lips, sort of flavor. Personally, I’m more fond of pikliz, but this is probably because I grew up eating it (recipe for pikliz). [...]

  3. [...] you can use a traditional recipe like this, but the heat level (4-6 scotch peppers???) scares me… so I have my non-traditional less [...]


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